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The Woodstock Shuttle Mystery (Upd.: Rapid Electric or GMC '13/'14)
This interesting photo of an electric bus was sent by Tim Martin. For a few years in the early 1920's the bus was used by the Woodstock Inn in Woodstock, Vermont to shuttle passengers between the railroad station and the inn. The original inn - built in 1892 - was torn down in 1968-69 and replaced by a new one located on the same property. The eagle now rests safely inside the new inn. The bus is ...
The Andreau Mystery (UPDATE VI: 100% Fiction!)
At a local flea market Fons Alkemade accidentally picked up a small book. Written by Karel Hartman and titled “Two of us to Zell am See” it described the adventures of two men travelling on a motor bike in the 1930s. Not really interested in bikes, Fons put the book down again, but then it fell open at page 105, with a photo the two travellers had taken of the Bugatti belonging to the Prince o...
Opel Eyed Engine Mystery (UPDATE III: Prototype or Tractor?)
Two weeks back an Opel engine emerged at the third floor of an Amsterdam apartment after the demise of the inhabitant. Nothing very special, be it that the engine bears the Opel 'eye' logo which results in a dating of pre 1935. Another problem arises with this assumption. The only 4-cylinder OHV made by Opel before the war was mounted in the 1938 Olympia OHV according to Jan Bruijn. Expert Georg A...
The Baker’s Buick Mystery (UPDATE: eel-catcher?)
No doubt these dressed-up kids are on their way to a fun party, fancy fair or about to participate in a celebration parade. Anyway, the dickey seat of 1926 Buick Roadster in the background will be large enough to carry them. Our photo dates from the early 1960s when the Buick’s owner was a baker, Frank Maisey, which might explain why the little boy on the left is dressed in white and carries a b...
The Seaside Streamline Sprint Mystery (UPDATE V: more about the Unsung Heroes of the 110 HP Gobron-Brillié)
Here’s a new mystery photo from the collection of Gies Pluim. You solved the other two so quickly that we don’t hesitate in presenting you with another. Again we have absolutely no idea what make of car this is, but we are most intrigued by this early attempt at streamlining. This photo seems taken around 1910 on the boulevard of a fashionable seaside resort like San Remo, Monte Carlo or maybe...
The Bugatti Coachwork Mystery (see UPDATEs)
A Bugatti type 44 two door berline is a very rare sight in itself. But then when you cannot find a word about the coachbuilder it's really getting interesting.... Who can learn us more about Carrosserie Germain & Chapiron from Lyon? Current UK owner Julian who found the car with a Belgium dealer would love to hear from you. And if you know of one (just 1) other Bugatti with this rare EB motometer...
The Longuemare Mystery (UPDATE III: Peugeot twin)
Layden Butler from California owns this strange carburetor. It was made by a company called Longuemare and obviously it was meant for a V-twin engine, possibly a motorcycle or a light car. The connection tubes to the cylinders measure 3/4" inside diameter. What we do know about the Longuemare carburetor is that they were made in France and that after a visit to Paris in 1901, the Holley brothers (...
The Mort and Faith Mystery (UPDATE V: Packard & Houpt-Rockwell)
The great-grandfather of Wade Treadway from Woodstock, Vermont had been a strong financial backer and adviser to Albert Rockwell who founded the New Departure Manufacturing Company. Among other things this company produced the Houpt-Rockwell, a rather large, powerful and expensive car with either four-cylinder or six-cylinder engines. Approximately 100 had been built when production was stopped in...
The Legg Coachbuilder Mystery (UPDATE V: Legge, not Legg?)
Car boot sales can yield real surprises. Even treasures! Take for instance this photo that was discovered by John Walker from the UK. The sturdy looking men stand in front of a group of sheds that, according to what’s written on the back of the photo, is the company of P. Legg Coachbuilders from Beaver Lane, Hammersmith, London. We admit we have never heard of Mr P. Legg before and don’t know ...
Mystery 208 (Update III: Léon Bollée..1902)
Not long ago Dutch car historian Hans Waldeck unearthed this photograph. These three young men had their picture (click for enlargement) taken near Lisse in Holland. According to the text on the back of the photo it was the first automobile in that town, but Hans is not convinced. The car bears registration number 208, which was issued on June 18, 1902 to Mr. Texeira de Mattos, who lived in the ne...
The Lost Luggage Mystery (Update II: between 1936 and 1939)
Some years ago Nico Claerhout found this trunk. He wanted to know what car it came from, so he wrote to the French prefecture quoting the French registration number on the trunk. They answered that the car was no longer registered in their department (the Jura). It was now registered in another, but they couldn’t tell him which one. Surely this means that the car still exists. After all, why bot...
The Speed Shoe Mystery (UPDATE III: Grégoire with Latham)
It may look like a Nike-ad, it's more likely a pre WWI one off streamline record car. We have no information about the spectacular vehicle except that it is one of the photos of French photographer M. Branger. So let's zoom into the front details that may help us. For a second or two the radiator badge gives the impression of a Spyker logo, but there is another unidentifiable oval badge lower on t...
The Oddball Roller Mystery (UPDATE III: Ranalah ?)
After 45 years in the USA this Rolls Royce has just returned to its native country. It’s a 1928 20hp Roadster with chassis number GWL9. The picture was probably taken when it arrived in the States. Look at the bent aerial, easier in shipping? It is believed this Rolls originally carried a coachwork by Crosbie & Dunn from Birmingham, who were responsible for about 75 Rolls-Royce bodies. During th...
A.N.Other Mystery? (UPDATE V: Viton and/or Thieulin)
In 1907 and 1908 Thieulin produced a conventional four-cylinder light car, but also made a racing two-seater. Two were entered in the 1908 Grand Prix des Voiturettes, held on July 6th in Dieppe. The Thieulin with number 35 finished eleventh and the other Thieulin with number 9 -driven by Zetwood and Guth- took sixth place. The picture was taken before the start in Dieppe and on its back is written...
The non-blue background mystery (UPDATE III: Export version)
Craig Little from Australia has a great interest in generally everything that is vintage Twenties and vintage French. So when he spotted this Citroën radiator at an auction, he found it difficult to resist. Craig is pretty convinced that it’s from a 5CV (the Cloverleaf), probably the later model, going on the fact that it has a removable radiator shell. But what intrigues him is that the colour...
The James Young Mystery (UPDATE III: indeed JY!)
Eighty years ago the trip by car from Weert to Arcen in the Dutch province of Limburg was a huge adventure. It still is today, as every year at the end of August Les Amis d’Amilcar des Pays Bas (friends of the Amilcar) invite their sporting colleagues to do the same. The event (click!) is open to all kinds of cycle cars, but also sports cars made until 1935 are encouraged to participate. This ye...
Figoni-Falaschi or Sodomka mystery ? (UPDATE XII: '39 Delahaye 135 sport, King Michael of Romania )
With Pebble Beach and many others in August at the horizon it's Concours month. (check our calender). People who frequent those lawns of glamour may recognise the photo sent to us by Russian car journalist Ivan Barentsev. We have literally no idea where to start looking based on this extreme 3 headlight boulevard Glitzer. The looks are very much Figoni like, but insiders will agree that the Czech ...
The Scintilla Mystery (UPDATE V: Imperia?)
Last year Swiss coachbuilder Hess celebrated the start of their business 125 years ago. Today the company makes buses and other commercial vehicles, but before World War II they produced some beautiful coachworks for luxury cars like the one on this Farman touring. And for the sales representatives of the Scintilla Works they made this two-seater coupe body. Scintilla produced ignition parts and i...
The Hill Climb Mystery (update: 1922 Amsterdam-Berlin)
Two images were found by Dutch car historian Henk Schuuring at a local antiques fair. Henk has no idea what the cars are and where the pictures were taken. The cars have Dutch country identifications (NL), but the landscape is certainly not Dutch as Holland is mostly flat as a pancake. We suspect the pictures were taken somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes and that the men were taking part in some so...
A Royal Airport Mystery (UPDATE IV: Spyker and Fokker)
Some Royal VIP arrives on the airport. A small crowd of curious spectators is just visible in the lower left hand corner of the photo. They seem to be waiting for a ceremony. Is the airport to be officially opened? Is the Royal visitor about to take off in one of the light aircrafts at the end of the field? Who is it? That’s what Uffe Mortensen, who sends us this picture, would like to know. Uff...

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