Coupe - Francisco Pueche will be present at Rétromobile, stand nr. 1N102
AngloCars 2017: An iconic showcase of veteran cars in Chile

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Turquoise Thunderbird the ultimate women's wheels?

Turquoise Thunderbird the ultimate womens wheels?
This weekend in 1991 a film opened in theatres only to become an instant hit: Thelma & Louise, about two women – Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis - on the road trip of their lives in a 1966 Ford Thunderbird. The dramatic ending of the movie makes an impact to this very day. We wondered what happened to the car after it ended in the Grand Canyon and found that a total of five identical turquoise Thunderbird convertibles is said to have been used for filming.

At least two of them supposedly survive, with one being sold at a Coys auction in Italy in 2008 for 65,000 dollars – according to the information here it was a 1964 car. This while another was sold with Barrett-Jackson in the US, also in 2008 for 71.500 dollars. There is also one in the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, but that may well be one of these two?

(Words editor, pictures MGM)
   

Friday, 25 May 2018

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Back to back: (relatively) cheap Aston Martins

Back to back: (relatively) cheap Aston Martins
We picked out two cars from Bonhams’ traditional Aston Martin Sale, to take place on the 2nd of June this year but in Reading rather than Newport Pagnell this time. But why this most unusual duo, you may ask? Well, apart from being Aston Martins it may indeed seem hard to find a link between the two, as they are more than miles apart. But this time it’s their price: both are estimated to make £40- to 60,000, and we simply wondered which one you would prefer to take home?

First is a 1951 DB2 Sports Saloon of which there can be no mistake about its barn find appearance. It’s an early ‘washboard’ model that’s been owned by the same man since 1966 and obviously in need of total restoration. The engine has supposedly been converted to 3-litre capacity from the original 2.6, and it is believed to have been fitted also with a Butler close-ratio gearbox and Alfin brake drums all round. All pretty desirable. But it also comes with a little difficulty though. Registration number, chassis number and engine number all appear to be correct ‘However, the car no longer has a chassis plate, and at time of cataloguing it had not been possible to locate a second chassis number on the front sub-frame; also, there is no engine number on the front timing cover in the usual place.” It will sell strictly as viewed and there are no documents with the car. To further quote the seller: “It once had an old-style buff logbook; if found, the logbook will be forwarded to the new owner.” The DB2’s full details can be found here.

Is that all a bit too much shrouded in mystery for you? And would you like to enjoy driving your Aston a bit sooner than that? Then the 1976 V8 Series 3 may be more in your street. It’s been off the road for 20 years and requires re-commissioning but is running and driving and has just some 99,000 miles on its clock. The original colour was changed from blue to what seems to be Primrose yellow, which – we think – does suit the model very well. Further good news is that the car comes with substantial history in the form of bills and expired MoT certificates, the former recording, amongst others, a full engine rebuild in April 1992 at 77,017 miles. A speedometer change is noted at 79,198 miles. Oh, and all the paperwork is present, too. All information is here. What would be your choice..?

(Words editor, pictures Bonhams)

Thursday, 24 May 2018

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Perfectly manicured lawn to host ‘the most incredible gatherings of cars’

Perfectly manicured lawn to host ‘the most incredible gatherings of cars’
When you had a look at the Royal wedding on the television last weekend, apart from the cars, the beautiful scenery of Windsor must have struck you too. So close to the city of London but also so far away from the maddening crowds. Well... usually.

But how about the spot seen above? The lawn is equally manicured but the spot is much more central. That’s the Honourable Artillery Company headquarters, on a stone’s throw from Saint Paul’s cathedral, the heart of The City and the river Thames. And from 8 to 9 June it’s the venue for the new City Concours. Over 80 cars are expected here, which will be divided into eight classes. Among these ‘Legends of Le Mans’ with the 1957 Ecurie Ecosse D-type ‘RSF 303’ that came second that year already confirmed (below).

According to the organizers each of the cars is carefully selected by the City Concours steering committee, while some of the UK’s best automotive manufacturers and specialists will also be bringing displays of cars, with an additional 80 supercars and sports cars for sale. Andrew Evans, the City Concours’ director: “We’ve got some of the world’s most knowledgeable experts sourcing incredible cars for the City Concours, and I think that really shows here. The D-Type is a perfect representation of the event; rare, beautiful, and with a story behind it. We’ll be confirming more cars and partners over the next few weeks, but it’s clear already that this will be one of the most incredible gatherings of cars and luxury brands that the City of London has ever seen.”

 

Wednesday, 23 May 2018

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Harry and Meghan’s sponsored E-type is electrically powered


The British Royals had come out in force, last weekend, and they’d brought the cream of their motor collection to Windsor Castle, too. The public was presented to the Queen’s famous 1950 Rolls-Royce Phantom IV and a trio of Daimler DS420s, to name just a few.

But the biggest motoring surprise may have come from Prince Harry and his new wife Meghan Markle’s Jaguar E-Type upon leaving Windsor Castle for the evening wedding reception. Other then his brother some seven years ago, Harry didn’t drive his father’s Aston Martin, but a blue Jaguar that came from the manufacturer itself. This car, originally a Series 1.5 built in 1968, was recently converted to electric power by the factory and is called Jaguar Concept Zero.

It’s said to have 295bhp, making it more powerful and faster than the original. Jaguar launched the service to restore and convert existing E-Types to electric power at a cost of some £350,000. Engineer behind the project Tim Hannig said: “It may not appeal to every Jaguar purist, but I hope it will attract well-heeled buyers who desire classic motoring without the oil leaks.” Oh, that strange number plate is a folly: ‘E190518’ refers to the date of Saturday's wedding...

Tuesday, 22 May 2018

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